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Vaginal Bacteria Statistics

Bacterial Vaginosis Overview

Bacterial vaginosis, or BV for short, is aninfection of the vagina that develops when the normal balance of vaginal bacteria isdisrupted. BV is the most common vaginal infectionwomen of childbearing age. Examples of activities that change the normalbacterial balance include douching, taking antibiotics, wearing an intrauterine deviceor IUD, and having unprotected sexual activity. BV is more commonsexually active womenthannonsexually active women, but it is not considered a sexually transmitted diseaseor STD. The main symptom of BV is a thin vaginal dischargethat appears grayish white and smells of fish,

especially after sexual activity. Other symptomsmay include burning when urinating, itching around the outside of the vagina, and irritation.These symptoms may also be caused by another type of infection, so it is important to seea . Many women with BV have no symptoms at all. BV is often diagnosed based on a pelvic examand symptoms, however certain tests can help confirm the diagnosis. BV will sometimes go away without treatment.Your healthcare provider may choose to treat it with antibiotics if your symptoms persist.

5 Myths About STIsSTDs You Probably Believe

Teacher: It is important to disclose STI statusto all sexual partners. Student: “Well I don't have any STIs,but if I did I wouldn't have any trouble telling my partners about it.� Voiceover: Well maybe. But it's possibleneither of those things are true. Let's talk about STIs. intro music Hi everyone! My name is Sarah, and welcomeback to Everyday Consent. Talking about Sexually Transmitted Infectionswith your partners, also known as STIs or

STDs, is an important part of informed consent.Knowing your partner's STI status helps you to know the health risks involvedhavingsex with them and make informed decisions about how you want to protect your health. But if a partner did tell you they had anSTI, how well would you really understand what that meant for you and your relationshipéThere is a lot of stigma and misinformation out there about STIs. Myths about STIs areso common that even if you did have decent sexual eduion, you might still believesome of them yourself. Being misinformedthis way can make having a meaningful conversationwith your partner about STI risks more difficult

and scary than it needs to be. To help makethose conversations a little easier, today I want to dispel my top Five Common MythsAbout STIs. Myth 1: STIs are really rare, or only happento irresponsible people or people who don't use condoms In truth, STIs are very common. In the US,14 teens will contract an STI each year. And fully half of all sexuallyactive peoplein the US will contract an STI by the time they turn 25. The Center for Disease Controlreports that most sexuallyactive people will get at least one type of HPVtheir lives,and several strains of that virus can cause

Genital Warts or Cervical Cancer. The WorldHealth Organization estimates that twothirds of the entire world population under the ageof 50 has HSV1, which is one of two strains of the virus that causes both oral and genitalHerpes. While Safer Sex methods such as condoms canprevent or greatly reduce the chance of spreading many STIs, some STIs such as HPV and Herpesare spread through skintoskin contact. This means that condoms cannot fully protect againsttransmission of these STIs during sex. And it also means that these STIs can be spreadthrough completely nonsexual contact, such as your Great Aunt Sally giving you a kisson the cheek when she has a cold sore.

So STIs are super common and even if someoneis really “responsible� and uses condoms every time they have sex, or doesn't havesex at all, they can still contract an STI. Myth 2: Everyone that has an STI knows thatthey have an STI Haha, nope! It is extremely common to havean STI and not know it. First of all someone might not be experiencing any symptoms. Accordingto the World Health Organization, the majority of STIs have no symptoms or only mild symptomsthat may not be recognized as an STI. That's why regular testing for STIs is recommendeegardless of whether you're actually showing symptoms.

But okay, at this point you're probablythinking, “Okay Sarah, I know, you gotta get tested. But I've been tested recentlyand they all came back negative. So I know I don't have anything.� Well, the thing is, even if you marched toyour 's office, head held high, and proclaimed “I would like a full STI panel,please! Give me everything you've got!� most places will actually only test you forthings that they think you are at risk for based on things like age, gender, ethnicity,loion,and sexual history. So if, for example, you area population determined to be atvery low risk for Syphilis, many places will

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